Invasives in the News

October 23, 2020

There have been new detections of EAB in VT: one in Richmond, VT, the first confirmed detection in Chittenden County and another detection in Shaftsbury VT, expanding the infested area in Bennington County.

Read more

October 6, 2020

Common barberry (Berberis vulgaris) is a member of the barberry family (Berberidaceae), which includes native species like Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) and mandrake (Podophylum peltatum), but there are no native members of the Berberis genus in New England. Species within the barberry family are perennial herbs or woody shrubs, all which have alternately arranged leaves. The woody shrub species in this family have spines located at nodes along the stems.

Read more

Butomus umbellatus

October 1, 2020

Butomus umbellatus, or flowering rush, is a non-native perennial that was introduced from Eurasia in the late 1800’s as a garden plant. Popular for its showy umbrella of petite, pink flowers, since its introduction to North America, this “garden” species has become an invasive and is listed on Vermont and many other states noxious weed lists.

Read more

July 2, 2020

In the Forest Insect and Disease Conditions Report for 2019, we shared that an isolated patch of what was suspected to be Japanese Stiltgrass (Microstegium vimineum) was reported in Sandgate in late 2018 (Bennington County). At the time, there had not been botanical confirmation of the presence of that plant, because the site was treated as part of a private land management project. A potential roadside site for this plant was reported in October 2019 in Brattleboro (Windham County). It was previously thought to be absent from Vermont, but these recent sightings provided by the public through the Report It feature on VTinvasives.org, have led the Vermont Natural Heritage Program to photographically confirm the populations in Bennington, Rutland, and Windham County, but do not have vouchers.

Read more

July 2, 2020

In our last issue of the VTInvasives e-newsletter, we discussed a new method of treating knotweed by using wire fencing laid horizontally on the ground over a patch of the offending species. Over the past two months, I have received several emails from readers asking some clarifying questions and looking for updates. I apologize for not being able to reply to everyone, and I hope that this article can provide an update with some answers.

Read more

April 3, 2020

There’s a patch of Japanese knotweed growing on the edge of a town park near my house that I see every morning when I walk my dog. It hasn’t started sending up green shoots yet this spring, but there can’t be too many more days before it does. For the past few years, this patch has been there, steadily growing and spreading each season, slowly creeping more interior into the forest each summer.

Read more

April 3, 2020

This April, I am observing the first days of spring like most of you are:  from my home office, socially distant from my friends and co-workers. Spring seems to be arriving this year without much fanfare other than a late season snowstorm, but in the teleworking times that we are living in, its arrival is still a thing to celebrate. In fact, being able to observe and enjoy the daily changes this seasonal transition brings during such a stressful time is a silver lining that I’m holding tightly on to.

Read more

April 1, 2020

Porcelainberry can be found in disturbed habitats and in landscaping, the shores of lakes and rivers, marshes, forests, and forest edges.

Read more

March 24, 2020

White fringetree was discovered to be a secondary host of emerald ash borers in North American in 2014, but researchers at Wright State University have found that white fringetrees in low-density ornamental landscapes were not a significant reservoir for emerald ash borer.

Read more

November 22, 2019

White-tailed deer are deeply rooted in our landscape and our state’s identity. They are a native species and play an important role in our ecosystem. However, transformations in our forest structure from centuries of land use changes, the removal of predator species like the gray wolf and mountain lion, and a warming climate have cumulatively allowed for deer to expand their range and increase their population in our state. Increased sprawl and suburbanization have also put these habitat generalists into our backyards and lives more than most people would like. Unfortunately, whether it be in the form of vehicle collisions, garden and landscape damage, or the increased prevalence of Lyme disease, negative encounters with deer are becoming more common for people in Vermont.

Read more

November 20, 2019

The colder temps and flurries of snow may make plant identification a thing of dreams for the coming summer. But one common invasive plant in Vermont can still be easily spotted throughout the winter months: common buckthorn.

Read more

Germinated water chestnut (Trapa natans) sprout intercepted at Lake Bomoseen in July 2019.

November 20, 2019

2019 Vermont Public Access Greeters successfully stop new infestations of aquatic invasive species from entering lakes and ponds throughout Vermont.

Read more

October 18, 2019

It is hard to believe that the Forest Hero! Network is fast approaching its 1st birthday! To celebrate, we'd like to share with everyone, the good work that volunteers are completing in their communities. If you are working on a project and would like to help inspire others who may be seeking ideas, please write in and we'll share in future newsletters! 

To learn more about the Network, and if you’d like to learn about other training opportunities, stay tuned to this website: https://vtinvasives.org/forest-hero-network

Read more

September 26, 2019

Amur Maple, Acer ginnala, belongs to the Sapindaceae family, which now includes previous members of Aceraceae (maple family). It is native to northern China and Japan, and was introduced into North America in 1860. Beginning in the 1950s, Amur Maple was reported as “locally established”.

Read more

September 26, 2019

On a sunny evening in May, about 30 environmental practitioners from around Vermont gathered at the Craftsbury Outdoor Center, where the snow had just about melted. As loons called on Big Hosmer Pond, and the worlds of natural resource regulation, conservation, and education clicked on outside, this group spent two days immersed in a concept that is at once head-smackingly simple and deceptively complex: a land ethic.

Read more