Hardy Kiwi (Actinidia arguta)

Invader Type: 

Control

Mechanical Control: 

More coming soon...

Source: photos USFS botanist Tom Rawinski, Mass Audubon Hardy Kiwi Fact Sheet, text and fact sheet developed by Mass Audubon Tom Lautzenheiser.  tlautzenheiser@massaudubon.org

Chemical Control: 

More coming soon...

Photos

Photos: 

These photos will help you to know this plant and understand it's invasive tednencies.

Source: photos USFS botanist Tom Rawinski, Mass Audubon Hardy Kiwi Fact Sheet, text and fact sheet developed by Mass Audubon Tom Lautzenheiser.  tlautzenheiser@massaudubon.org

Description

Identification: 

Hardy kiwi is a twining, woody vine with alternate, simple leaves. Its leaves have distinctive red petioles and finely-toothed, wavy margins. Flowers are pale green/white and clustered in the leaf axils, while the fruits are green, grape-shaped, and smooth. Hardy Kiwi resembles Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) in habit, but the mature bark of Hardy Kiwi is gray and flaky. Hardy Kiwi is native to east Asia.

Hardy Kiwi vines can grow over 20 feet per year, overwhelming other vegetation by forming dense mats and curtains. In winter, trees supporting Hardy Kiwi vines cannot bear snow and ice loading, causing branches to break and trunks to snap.

Potential Threat
As its name implies, Hardy Kiwi tolerates cold temperatures (to -25oF or lower). Various entities in the U.S., including several state agricultural extension services, promote Hardy Kiwi as an alternative crop vine, evidently unaware of its capacity to become established in and disrupt natural areas. If Hardy Kiwi becomes widely planted in the region, the potential for its escape from cultivation will increase, with possible dire consequences for forestlands. Avoiding this threat by not propagating Hardy Kiwi is prudent.

There is a lot of effort by gardeners to promote hardy kiwi. Read this interesting series of articles about the debate surrounding this plant.

Source: photos USFS botanist Tom Rawinski, Mass Audubon Hardy Kiwi Fact Sheet, text and fact sheet developed by Mass Audubon Tom Lautzenheiser.  tlautzenheiser@massaudubon.org

Dispersal: 

Hardy Kiwi fruits are eaten by Raccoons. Other mammals, and possibly large birds such as Wild

Source: photos USFS botanist Tom Rawinski, Mass Audubon Hardy Kiwi Fact Sheet, text and fact sheet developed by Mass Audubon Tom Lautzenheiser.  tlautzenheiser@massaudubon.org

History: 
There is a lot of effort by gardeners to promote hardy kiwi. Read this interesting series of articles about the debate surrounding this plant.