Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis)

Invader Type: 

Photos

Description

Pest Overview and Identification: 

What does emerald ash borer look like? Visit Wisconsin's EAB Information Source or Vermont emerald ash borer look alikes.

Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is an exotic beetle that was discovered in southeastern Michigan near Detroit in the summer of 2002. The larvae feed in the cambium between the bark and wood, producing S-shaped galleries that girdle and kill branches and trees. Emerald ash borer probably arrived in the United States on solid wood packing material carried in cargo ships or airplanes originating in its native Asia.

Emerald ash borer has spread rapidly in the United States, killing millions of trees, and is expected to reach Vermont. White ash is one of the ten most common tree species in Vermont, so this insect will have a major impact when it becomes established in the state.  The closest infestations are in south-central NH, Berkshire County, MA, New York's Hudson Valley, and just 30 miles north of the Vermont border in Quebec. 

 

Reproductive Strategy / Lifecycle: 
Signs and Symptoms of Pest: 

Emerald ash borer only attacks ash trees, making it important to learn how to identify them. Lean more on ash tree identification.

It's also important to learn the signs and symptoms caused by emerald ash borer.

Threat

Distribution: 

Where can emerald ash borer be found? View the most current distribution of Emerald Ash Borer in North America.  The closest infestations are in Merrimack County, NH, Berkshire County, MA, New York's Hudson Valley, and just 30 miles north of the Vermont border in Carignan, Quebec.